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Newest How to Teach Guides

How to Teach Born a Crime
Born a Crime

Learn all about teaching Trevor Noah’s memoir in the classroom with this free guide.

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How to Teach The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby

Learn how to analyze and discuss Fitzgerald's depiction of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby.

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How to Teach Ghost
Ghost

Race through our latest teaching guide for Jason Reynolds’s Ghost!

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How to Teach The Poet X
The Poet X

Need inspiration for bringing The Poet X to your classroom? Our latest teaching guide has you covered.

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All How to Teach Guides

How to Teach 1984
1984

George Orwell’s prophetic novel will foster discussions about politics, society, and the role of technology.

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How to Teach The Alchemist
The Alchemist

This inspirational tale about following one's dreams is sure to provide students with an uplifting perspective on life.

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How to Teach Angela's Ashes
Angela's Ashes

Consider teaching Frank McCourt’s poignant memoir that details a family’s struggles with poverty in 1930s-1940s Ireland.

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How to Teach Animal Farm
Animal Farm

Learn how to teach the allegorical themes present in George Orwell’s iconic novella.

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How to Teach Antigone
Antigone

The third of Sophocles’ Theban plays, Antigone is a tragedy that examines governmental authority and moral responsibility.

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How to Teach The Awakening
The Awakening

Kate Chopin’s most famous work is a powerful examination of gender roles and society in the 19th-century American South.

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How to Teach Beloved
Beloved

Spook and delight your students by teaching Toni Morrison’s novel Beloved.

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How to Teach Beowulf
Beowulf

Use this epic to examine the traits of heroes and monsters and introduce students to Old English works.

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How to Teach The Best of Poe
The Best of Poe

Poe's stories and poems will both fulfill your English Language arts needs and captivate your students along the way.

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How to Teach Black Boy
Black Boy

Richard Wright’s eloquent account of his life in the Jim Crow South makes a great addition to any unit on autobiographies.

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How to Teach Bless Me, Ultima
Bless Me, Ultima

Explore universal themes of fear and revenge in Rudolfo Anaya's coming-of-age novel.

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How to Teach The Bluest Eye
The Bluest Eye

Learn how to teach the complicated themes of race and beauty standards in Toni Morrison’s timeless novel.

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How to Teach The Book Thief
The Book Thief

Find out why Markus Zusak’s bestseller is quickly becoming one of the most popular novels in English classrooms.

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How to Teach Born a Crime
Born a Crime

A witty coming-of-age tale, this memoir deftly tackles themes relating to racism, identity, and overcoming adversity.

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How to Teach Brave New Word
Brave New World

Students will love reading about Huxley’s vision of a dystopian society set in an eerily believable future.

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How to Teach The Call of the Wild
The Call of the Wild

Buck’s canine adventure in the Yukon is a fun way to teach students about the American frontier and literary naturalism.

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How to Teach The Canterbury Tales
The Canterbury Tales

Take your students on a journey through medieval England with Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.

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How to Teach The Catcher in the Rye
The Catcher in the Rye

Learn how to teach The Catcher in the Rye, a classic novel that captures what it’s like to be a teenager.

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How to Teach The Chocolate War
The Chocolate War

The Chocolate War will challenge students to examine their own answers to the question, “Do I dare disturb the universe?”

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How to Teach A Christmas Carol
A Christmas Carol

Teach your students about the power of empathy through Charles Dickens’s classic novella, A Christmas Carol.

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How to Teach Coraline
Coraline

A cross between a horror story and a fairytale, Coraline is an engaging read packed with ghosts, talking cats, and other creatures.

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How to Teach The Crucible
The Crucible

Discover ways to show students how the themes present in The Crucible continue to have social relevance.

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How to Teach Cry, the Beloved Country
Cry, the Beloved Country

Alan Paton presents a story about fathers and sons, human nature, and the societal problems that led to apartheid.

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How to Teach Death of a Salesman
Death of a Salesman

Have your students learn about the importance of stage directions and dialogue through Arthur Miller’s tragic play.

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How to Teach Divergent
Divergent

Examine ideas about society and class, governmental control, and the construction of identity by teaching Divergent.

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How to Teach A Doll's House
A Doll's House

A Doll's House critiques the expectations of women, the importance of money, and the need for individual freedom.

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How to Teach Dracula
Dracula

Bram Stoker’s famous work introduces students to Gothic fiction and the format of an epistolary novel.

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How to Teach Edith Hamilton's Mythology
Edith Hamilton's Mythology

By reading Edith Hamilton’s Mythology, students will see how ancient myths remain relevant to modern storytelling.

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How to Teach Ender's Game
Ender's Game

Ender’s Game is a modern science-fiction classic, perfect for discussion of governmental and military ethics.

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How to Teach Fahrenheit 451
Fahrenheit 451

Help students decipher the figurative language, symbolism, and imagery within Ray Bradbury's famous dystopian novel.

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How to Teach Farewell to Manzanar
Farewell to Manzanar

Consider teaching this nonfiction memoir for its messages on identity, racial prejudice, and the loss of innocence.

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How to Teach Fast Food Nation
Fast Food Nation

Examine Eric Schlosser’s exposé on American fast food culture that will definitely spark classroom discussion.

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How to Teach The Fault in Our Stars
The Fault in Our Stars

John Green’s popular novel presents a compelling story and dares to tackle themes of fate, love, and death.

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How to Teach Fences
Fences

Fences examines historic racism in America and explores the themes of family, gender roles, and responsibility.

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How to Teach Fever 1793
Fever 1793

Set during Philadelphia’s yellow fever epidemic, Fever, 1793 is a great novel to pair with a science or history lesson.

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How to Teach Flowers for Algernon
Flowers for Algernon

Use this novel to spark discussion on the ethics of scientific research and the shifting nature of identity.

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How to Teach Frankenstein
Frankenstein

Explore the consequences of social alienation and ambition in Mary Shelley’s classic horror story, Frankenstein.

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How to Teach Freakonomics
Freakonomics

Have your students build critical-thinking skills as they learn about economic theory and its applications in Freakonomics.

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How to Teach Friday Night Lights
Friday Night Lights

Friday Night Lights takes a close look at the various social and psychological issues that arise in sports culture.

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How to Teach Ghost
Ghost

Race through our latest teaching guide for Jason Reynolds’s Ghost!

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How to Teach The Giver
The Giver

Discover new ways for your students to explore complex themes in Lois Lowry’s acclaimed dystopian tale, The Giver.

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How to Teach The Glass Castle
The Glass Castle

Help students understand the many differences between memoir and autobiography by teaching The Glass Castle.

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How to Teach The Glass Menagerie
The Glass Menagerie

One of Tennessee Williams’s finest plays, The Glass Menagerie is the perfect medium for discussing symbolism.

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How to Teach The Grapes of Wrath
The Grapes of Wrath

The Grapes of Wrath provides a great opportunity to learn about the devastating circumstances of the Dust Bowl.

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How to Teach The Graveyard Book
The Graveyard Book

Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book blends folklore and legends with Gothic, horror, and mystery genres.

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How to Teach Great Expectations
Great Expectations

Charles Dickens’s classic novel unfolds the journey of one ambitious orphan’s remarkable personal growth.

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How to Teach The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby

Learn how to analyze and discuss Fitzgerald's depiction of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby.

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How to Teach Grendel
Grendel

John Gardner’s classic retelling of one of literature’s most famous villains is a fantastic companion to Beowulf.

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How to Teach Hamlet
Hamlet

Use Hamlet’s key themes as a basis for classroom discussion on justice, mortality, revenge, deception, and family.

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How to Teach The Handmaids Tale
The Handmaids Tale

If you need material for a lesson plan on dystopian societies or feminism, teach Margaret Atwood’s novel in your classroom.

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How to Teach Hatchet
Hatchet

Students will love the wilderness adventure story present in Gary Paulsen’s award-winning Hatchet.

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How to Teach The Hate U Give
The Hate U Give

Rich with literary merit and gripping social commentary, The Hate U Give will have your students eager to read more.

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How to Teach Heart of Darkness
Heart of Darkness

Interesting juxtapositions and historical context make Conrad’s novella a great choice for the classroom.

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How to Teach The Help
The Help

Learn how to teach The Help, a book that takes on racism and sexism in 1960s Mississippi.

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How to Teach Hiroshima
Hiroshima

Teaching Hersey’s journalistic book opens up conversation about both past and present warfare and violence in the world.

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How to Teach The Hobbit
The Hobbit

Introduce students to varying aspects of the modern fantasy genre with this guide to teaching The Hobbit.

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How to Teach The House of the Scorpion
The House of the Scorpion

The House of the Scorpion blends science fiction and dystopian fiction into one story your students won’t forget.

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How to Teach The Hunger Games
The Hunger Games

Get everything you need to know about teaching The Hunger Games—a perfect introduction to young adult dystopian fiction.

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How to Teach I Am Malala
I Am Malala

Help your students experience the power of words by checking out our free guide to teaching I Am Malala!

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How to Teach In Cold Blood
In Cold Blood

Gripping social analysis and a look into the criminal justice system make In Cold Blood a great nonfiction title to teach.

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How to Teach Into the Wild
Into the Wild

Start conversations about the advantages and flaws of modern society, consumerism, and naturalism with Into the Wild.

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How to Teach Into Thin Air
Into Thin Air

Inspire discussions about perseverance, motivation, and the dangers of commercialization by teaching Into Thin Air.

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How to Teach Invisible Man
Invisible Man

Invisible Man examines the neglectful relationship between African Americans and society in the 1930s.

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How to Teach Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre

This classic examines class and gender dynamics during the Victorian era and is often viewed as a proto-feminist work.

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How to Teach The Joy Luck Club
The Joy Luck Club

The Joy Luck Club portrays mother-daughter relationships and the complex dual identities of Chinese Americans.

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How to Teach Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar

Teach students about real historical events while they enjoy the story of the struggle to seize power over Rome.

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How to Teach King Lear
King Lear

The tragedy of King Lear is an impressive exploration of power, family, justice, and gender.

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How to Teach The Kite Runner
The Kite Runner

The Kite Runner is perfect for cross-curricular studies in history and social studies classes.

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How to Teach The Last Lecture
The Last Lecture

Randy Pausch’s memoir is a great choice for any nonfiction unit because of its inspiring content and strong themes.

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How to Teach A Lesson Before Dying
A Lesson Before Dying

Race, inequality, and education are just some of the themes students will encounter in A Lesson Before Dying.

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How to Teach Life of Pi
Life of Pi

Life of Pi by Yann Martel is sure to spark discussions about the role of spirituality, nature, reality, and growth.

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How to Teach The Lightning Thief
The Lightning Thief

Students will love following and analyzing teenage demigod Percy Jackson in his role as a hero.

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How to Teach Little Bee
Little Bee

Little Bee will surely start class discussions about globalization and ways we can better protect the innocent.

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How to Teach A Long Walk to Water
A Long Walk to Water

A Long Walk to Water presents a dual narrative that tackles the political and social issues that exist in Sudan.

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How to Teach A Long Way Gone
A Long Way Gone

Ishmael Beah’s memoir will give students insight into one of the most important human rights issues in our world today.

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How to Teach Lord of the Flies
Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies will provoke thoughtful discussions about the dark side of human nature, loss of innocence, and survival.

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How to Teach The Lovely Bones
The Lovely Bones

Consider teaching The Lovely Bones for its commentary on mortality, spirituality, and the afterlife.

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How to Teach Macbeth
Macbeth

Explore the differences between fate and free will by teaching Macbeth in your classroom.

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How to Teach Maus I
Maus I

Learn how you can introduce your class to the tremendous power and rich symbolism found in Maus I, a graphic novel.

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How to Teach The Maze Runner
The Maze Runner

Have your students examine the conflicts of man vs. man and man vs. society in The Maze Runner.

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How to Teach Me Before You
Me Before You

Jojo Moyes’s quirky romantic novel will challenge students to think about life, love, and personal growth.

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How to Teach The Metamorphosis
The Metamorphosis

Vagueness and intrigue found throughout the text make Franz Kafka’s allegory perfect to dissect in a classroom.

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How to Teach A Midsummer Night's Dream
A Midsummer Night's Dream

This Shakespeare play provides a lighthearted introduction to Elizabethan theater and its literary and social conventions.

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How to Teach Mockingjay
Mockingjay

The final book in The Hunger Games trilogy, Mockingjay questions the justifications surrounding war and rebellion.

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How to Teach Monster
Monster

Court is in session: Learn everything you need to know about Monster with this free guide!

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How to Teach My Louisiana Sky
My Louisiana Sky

Kimberly Willis Holt’s acclaimed novel explores universal themes of self-confidence and acceptance.

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How to Teach Native Son
Native Son

Richard Wright’s Native Son presents an unflinching depiction of institutionalized racism and its consequences.

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How to Teach Night
Night

Haunting and intense, Elie Wiesel’s Night presents powerful lessons on survival, faith, and the human condition.

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How to Teach Number the Stars
Number the Stars

Lowry’s award-winning novel depicts the Nazi occupation of Denmark in a manner appropriate for a younger audience.

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How to Teach The Odyssey
The Odyssey

Examine a variety of literary techniques, including symbolism, foreshadowing, and allusion, within Homer’s timeless epic.

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How to Teach Oedipus Rex
Oedipus Rex

The universal themes of guilt, sorrow, justice, and family make this otherwise daunting text accessible.

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How to Teach Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men

Spark discussions on isolation, nature, friendship, and the American Dream by teaching Steinbeck’s naturalist story.

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How to Teach The Old Man and the Sea
The Old Man and the Sea

Short but sweet, Ernest Hemingway’s classic novella is as approachable as it is significant to English literature.

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How to Teach Orphan Train
Orphan Train

This historical novel raises intriguing questions about identity and society’s demand for assimilation.

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How to Teach Othello
Othello

The incidents of jealousy, betrayal, and manipulation in Othello make the play a great addition to any syllabus.

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How to Teach The Other Wes Moore
The Other Wes Moore

Following the lives of two men with the same name, The Other Wes Moore presents lessons on nature versus nurture.

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How to Teach Our Town
Our Town

Learn about the important academic components of Thornton Wilder’s classic play within a play.

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How to Teach Outliers
Outliers

Read about how Outliers, which details the factors that influence success, would be a great addition to any syllabus.

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How to Teach The Outsiders
The Outsiders

Inspire classroom discussions on identity and class by teaching S. E. Hinton’s classic young adult novel.

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How to Teach The Pearl
The Pearl

John Steinbeck's enduring parable warns of the corrupting nature of wealth and the destructiveness of greed.

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How to Teach Persepolis
Persepolis

Encourage students to consider how images and text work together to form a narrative with Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis.

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How to Teach The Poet X
The Poet X

If you’re aiming to slam poetry into the hearts of your students, look no further than novel-in-verse, The Poet X.

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How to Teach The Poisonwood Bible
The Poisonwood Bible

Consider teaching The Poisonwood Bible for its themes of family, gender roles, religion, and political turmoil.

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How to Teach Pride and Prejudice
Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen’s enduring story critiques love, marriage, reputation, class, and social intrigue.

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How to Teach Pygmalion
Pygmalion

George Bernard Shaw’s witty play provides many lessons on humor, sarcasm, and irony.

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How to Teach A Raisin in the Sun
A Raisin in the Sun

Learn how to discuss and examine the important social issues presented in A Raisin in the Sun.

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How to Teach Reading Lolita in Tehran
Reading Lolita in Tehran

Use Azar Nafisi’s moving memoir to teach students about Iranian history and the importance of books and fiction.

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How to Teach The Road
The Road

If you’re thinking of adding The Road to your dystopian unit, explore its major themes, literary elements, and more.

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How to Teach Romeo and Juliet
Romeo and Juliet

This classic tragedy about two star-crossed lovers makes the perfect introduction to Shakespeare’s works.

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How to Teach The Scarlet Letter
The Scarlet Letter

Learn how to tackle Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Romantic classic with this guide to teaching The Scarlet Letter.

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How to Teach The Secret Life of Bees
The Secret Life of Bees

Sue Monk Kidd’s coming-of-age novel examines the Civil Rights Movement, family, and the power of female friendships.

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How to Teach A Separate Peace
A Separate Peace

Consider teaching A Separate Peace for its strong examples of narrative perspective and use of foil characters.

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How to Teach Siddhartha
Siddhartha

Introduce students to Eastern philosophy with this inspiring tale of perseverance and spiritual enlightenment.

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How to Teach Slaughterhouse Five
Slaughterhouse Five

This novel explores fate and free will and the effects of war in a work that is equal parts absurd, hilarious, and sad.

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How to Teach Speak
Speak

Laurie Halse Anderson’s story of isolation, grief, and hope provides lessons on symbolism and character development.

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How to Teach The Stranger
The Stranger

Albert Camus’s magnum opus is sure to engage the classroom and lead to deep discussions about what it means to be human.

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How to Teach A Streetcar Named Desire
A Streetcar Named Desire

A Streetcar Named Desire offers great opportunities to discuss class, gender identity, and the importance of appearance.

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How to Teach The Sun Also Rises
The Sun Also Rises

This classic work of the Lost Generation examines the effects of World War I on those who came of age during that time.

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How to Teach A Tale of Two Cities
A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens’s novel illustrates the simultaneous hope and despair that revolutionary times bring.

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How to Teach The Taming of the Shrew
The Taming of the Shrew

The Taming of the Shrew will surely spark class discussion on marriage and the treatment and role of women.

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How to Teach Tangerine
Tangerine

Use Tangerine to introduce the journal narrative and create a platform for discussion of social and familial issues.

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How to Teach Tears of a Tiger
Tears of a Tiger

Students will love Tears of a Tiger for its relatable characters and honest portrayal of teenage angst and depression.

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How to Teach Things Fall Apart
Things Fall Apart

Identify essential objectives and examine themes, motifs, and literary elements within Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart.

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How to Teach The Things They Carried
The Things They Carried

Explore deeper meanings, new perspectives, and important literary elements in Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried.

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How to Teach A Thousand Splendid Suns
A Thousand Splendid Suns

A Thousand Splendid Suns will inspire conversations about the roles of tradition and freedom amid a changing society.

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How to Teach To Kill a Mockingbird
To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird provides a vehicle for discussions about racial injustice and the struggle between good and evil.

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How to Teach Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism

Teaching Transcendentalism will provide the perfect introduction to one of the world’s most influential philosophies.

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How to Teach Tuesdays with Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie

If you're trying to expand the nonfiction you teach, consider Tuesdays with Morrie, a truly thought-provoking memoir.

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How to Teach Twelve Angry Men
Twelve Angry Men

Have your students take a look into the United States' judicial system with Reginald Rose's Twelve Angry Men.

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How to Teach Warriors Don't Cry
Warriors Don't Cry

Help your students understand a crucial event in American history by teaching Melba Pattillo Beals’s harrowing memoir.

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How to Teach Wonderstruck
Wonderstruck

Learn ways to discuss how Wonderstruck's visual format helps influence the story's interpretation.

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How to Teach Wuthering Heights
Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontё’s use of literary techniques and Romantic elements in Wuthering Heights make for an intricate and exciting tale.

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